Scots Naval personnel help support Poppyscotland

Royal Navy personnel from units around Scotland recently supported charity Poppyscotland in helping to highlight a sculpture marking the centenary of the signing of the Armistice.

Scots Naval personnel help support PoppyscotlandSailors from HM Naval Base Clyde, HMS Dalriada and aircraft carrier Prince of Wales, joined Glasgow Lord Provost Eva Bolander and artist Simon Burns-Cox at the city’s Riverside Museum.

They were there to witness the unveiling of Simon’s stunning and symbolic First World War sculpture, 'France 1914', which the artist has donated to Poppyscotland.

“We are very pleased this symbolic sculpture will now be on show in the Riverside Museum,” said Lord Provost Eva Bolander.

“I am sure people will be struck by the beauty of the work and encourage them to spend a little time considering the devastating consequences of war, both in the past and in conflict that sadly continues today.”

The sculpture was intended to represent the last remaining tree on the battlefront and a symbol of hope

Simon Burns-Cox, artwork creator

While the sculpture depicts the last tree standing on the Western Front battlefield, it commemorates all who made the ultimate sacrifice in the Great War, including 43,930 members of the Royal Navy.

It was only fitting that members of the modern navy attended the Riverside Museum, close to the former site of the famous Glasgow shipyards where so many of the vessels that played a pivotal role in the First World War were built.

Once the sculpture has been exhibited it will be auctioned off with the funds going to the Armed Forces charity.

Simon Burns-Cox, who created the artwork, said, “I believe in supporting the Armed Forces in any way I can as they have put their lives on the line for us.

“The sculpture was intended to represent the last remaining tree on the battlefront and a symbol of hope. It is made from black and gold Portoro marble which has been carved and highly polished by hand. It took me about a year to make.”